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on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
edward snowden, a spanish newspaper reported the nsa collected numbers and locations of the phone calls, but not actual content. this after learning that the nsa has also been tuning into the communications up dirty five world leaders. now the european union parliamentary delegation is preparing for a visit to the u.s. to express concerns over nsa surveillance tactics. political commentator sam sacks brings us more. >> german intelligence officials will come to washington dc to demand answers from the white house about surveillance on chancellor angela merkel. is a marked the partner from just a few months ago, when germany was defending its foes cooperation with the nsa. that was after edward snowden leak in june that the nsa was collecting a half ilya and telephone and internet telik communications every month. chancellor angela merkel was put to defend her government's cooperation with the nsa, saying it prevented terrorist attacks. we can only protect the population if we cooperate with others, her office said. edward snowden describe the cozy relationship between german spies and t
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
from spain. this is based on documents provided by edward snowden. >> arriving for an uncomfortable meeting, the u.s. ambassador in major it has questions to answer after a spanish newspaper published elite documents showing u.s. intelligence services tracked more than 60 million phone calls made in spain between december and january of this year. a massive 3.5 million calls in one day. they say the monitoring appears to track where the calls were made and how long they lasted, but not their content. the spanish government has demanded full details about what information was collected from their citizens. >> as always, we learn about what is going on after it has happened. that is how it is with american intelligence. they are always ahead of us. >> it is a disgrace they are spying on governments and ministers. we will see what happens, but to me, this is a very serious violation. >> it comes after the prime rejected calls for an eu wide no-spying agreement. they wanted more information before supporting the special arrangement with the united states. he white house has denied that
on information from edward snowden, following allegations that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. the white house denies that. congressman peter king and former vice president dick chaney said the u.s. should stop apologising for the nsa surveillancism. >> overall intelligence is important and need to be preserved. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives, not just in the united states, but france and germany and throughout europe. the french are ones to talk - the fact is they've carried out spying against the united states - both government and industry. >> jeanne shaheen of new hampshire takes a different stance, calling on the nsa to come clean about surveillance programs. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we've listened in. we have repair twork do. we have hard questions we need to ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> meanwhile -
edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying on them because its keeping them safe. not much there. there is talk of ongoing dialogue but the chairman of european union foreign affairs has said confidence has been damaged. >> has anything been said that their spying headquarters have been linked so they can share the spy information. >> reporter: that's the big question, what we haven't learned from the edward snowden is the amount of cooperation from the european governments and the national security agency. this is something that they have been very concerned about. as far as world leaders who are talking about things, angela merkel and so on, yo
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that serve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intel
's leaders. this after documents from edward snowden suggest that the u.s. was bugging angela merkel xfone -- angela merkel's a phone. they met to ask about the claims and edward snowden said he was willing to help the german government investigate. police in california have begun investigations into the shooting at los angeles airport that killed a security officer and disrupted more than 700 flights across the united states. the alleged shooter, a 27-year- old man stormed into a terminal, killing one officer and injuring at least three other people. the police shot and injured him before taking him into custody. police say he had more than 100 rounds of ammunition. back in the headlines as sectarian violence has claimed 7000 lives this year alone. the most violence they have seen since 2008. they are struggling to push back al qaeda. hase minister al-maliki called for more support from the united states. october was the bloodiest month in iraq in nine years, as 7000 people died in the strikes between sunni and shiite. the government of a rack cannot get the violence under control on thei
as the leaks keep on coming from edward snowden from the top adviser to the president about what the president knew and when he knew it. first today's trivia question. what is the most populous state with one woman in its congressional delegation. the first person to tweet the correct question will get the on air shout out. the answer and more coming up next. [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. i remember thinking there's a lot i have to do... check my blood sugar, eat better. start insulin. today i learned there's something i don't have to do anymore. my doctor said with levemir® flexpen... i don't have to use a syringe and a vial. levemir® flexpen comes prefilled with long-acting insulin taken once daily for
, that somebody may be america. thanks edward snowden. we spin on that. on monday, all music all hour long lou reed, "take a walk on the wild side." ♪ [ female announcer ] who are we? we are the thinkers. the job jugglers. the up all-nighters. and the ones who turn ideas into action. we've made our passions our life's work. we strive for the moments where we can say, "i did it!" ♪ we are entrepreneurs who started it all... with a signature. legalzoom has helped start over 1 million businesses, turning dreamers into business owners. and we're here to help start yours. >>> everybody is to leave here immediately. this is closed until further notice. clear the room at once. >> how can he close me up? on what ground? >> i'm shocked to find out gambling is going on in here. >> thank you, very much. >> shocked, shocked, i say. you mean to tell me the national security agency had the power to spy on whomever they pleased and may have taken advantage of that power? >> you can bet nsa surveillance will be a topic of conversation when they meet with secretary of state john kerry in the oval office. a
, you heard what senator feinstein said about granting clemency to edward snowden and bringing him back to help investigate the national security agency. >> well, the only investigation here is to what extent he knew about the material that he stole and who else he worked with. certainly the russians are not allowing him to stay in the country of russia because they think he's just a nice guy there. is clearly more to this story. i think that is a -- if he wants to come back and open up to the responsibility of the fact that he took and stole information, he violated his oath, he disclosed classified information, that by the way has allowed three different terrorist organization, affiliates of al qaeda to change the way they communicate, i'd be happy to have that discussion with him. but he does need to own up with what he's done. if he wants to talk through why he did it those things that would be the appropriate time and the appropriate way to do it. >> schieffer: you would not be willing to give him any kind of clemency, i take it? >> no. i don't see any reason. i wouldn't do that
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
information from whistle blower edward snowden may soon emerge detailing their cooperation in the dragnet surveillance of their citizens if not the monitoring of their leaders' phone calls. al jazeera, washington. >> a british man has been arrested and charged with hacking in to the computer systems of several federal agencies including nasa and the u.s. army. 28-year-old lovie love was arrested last friday at his home northeast of london he was invited in new jersey where he used a serve tore carry out the attacks. love also faces charges related to attacks in virginia it cost the government millions of dollars. >> jersey hayes begun in to the hacking scandal that brought down the news of the world in 2011. eight people, including two of the papers former editors are now on trial. rory has more now from london. >> reporter: the defendants arrived on time for their trial but the storms that hit the u.k. southeast overnight meant that not everyone could be so prompt. proceedings got underway maybe three hours late. no matter, this is likely to be one of the u.k.s longest trials in years. t
from edward snowden has gone on to what anyone realize beyond the wiretapping of angela merkel's personal cell phone. it's hard to believe a terrorist would call her up and say i'm a terrorist and just that i would let you know we are going to blow up a building. doesn't sound very likely that they should be doing that. at least that's my opinion. >> host: what do you make of the revolution's overall but the work the nsa is doing and how that either helps or contributes to what the work at the fbi and the cia do? >> guest: well, the fbi is an important agency obviously. it seemed to miss revelations that they've gone beyond what anyone suspected they could be doing. i personally don't think the correction of what they call metadata, which is like every phone call, you know, is not overheard. that seems to me to be going on what his message very. if they have a bad guy, they can go to the foreign intelligence surveillance court and put on for a warrant and they'll get a warrant in almost every case. to wiretap that person. they don't need to know that i was talking to my brother
that killed a u.s. ambassador. >> accused nsa leaker edward snowden making new friends and maybe looking for a new home. germany maybe? >> and unearthed a drug tunnel between mexico and the united states that is so sophisticated, it is being called a supertunnel. we're going to take you on a tour. welcome to around the world". i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael holmes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers with us all week. >> first we're going to get to this, benghazi, libya, it was just last ept, four americans were killed in a terrorist attack. one of them the u.s. ambassador. >> today a lot of pressure from republicans in congress to hear directly from cia operatives who were in libya during the attack and also afterwards. so far they have not talked to congress. >> we here at cnn have reported the cia has specifically told those operators to keep quiet. drew griffin is with the cnn investigations unit. drew, first of all, excellent reporting on all of this. they're pushing back right now on what you're reporting. what are they saying? >> being complet
intelligence officer, edward snowden. then, the embarrassin embarrassa merkel phone tapping. barack obama is ordering a,. >> trying to get some answers. they've said that trust needs to be rebuilt. but in a few hours' time the director of national intelligence and the director of the nsa will face congressional grilling. we will talk with our correspondent in washington after this story by bernard smith. >>> this could be about to end. in an interview, president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose: to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> this has partly been prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor angela merkel's phone in 2010. officials say that's not true and the white house only discovered surveillance in the summer and the bugging of merkel's phone soon after. the delegation that's visiting is concerned about the surveillance of tens of millions of its citizen
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
merkel's phone and allowed it to continue. it came out after edward snowden said the u.s. has spied on world leaders. what president obama spoke to chancellor merkel when the two spoke about the spying. >> the president said we're not going to do this going forward. >> but it may have been done in the past. >> we don't want to get into the business of inventorying everything we've done in the past but what we're looking at is how can we both make necessary reforms in how we gather intelligence and how can we be more transparent about what we're doing with our allies and the public. >> joining me now ambassador mark ginsburg. it's great to have you here. the white house finds itself caught between a rock and a hard place. now they have to come out and ask for forgiveness as opposed to permission, because they never would have gotten permission to do this. but this is not unheard of. this is what we do as a country. >> spies r us. >> we've been doing it for a long time. is it just the fact that we are surprised that it would get to this level and now expect to believe that the white h
almost all based on information leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden suggest the u.s. has been spying on many countries and their leaders, including important u.s. allies. >> the white house denies the report that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german leader angela merkel. we have the latest. >> a nine member delegation will meet with senior government officials over allegations of widespread spying against leaders. new allegations surfaced that president obama approved spying on german chancellor angela merkel. according to the wall street journal, the president was unaware the n.s.a. was spying on world leaders and ordered the agency to stop some of the monitoring programs after learning of them. >> the president assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> it's not just the europeans who are upset. over the weekend, thousands marched on washington to express their outrage. >> against mass surveillance and i'm truly honored to speak for all whistle blowers. >> some memb
, edward snowden, who said agents had been secretly gathering the phone and internet data of private citizens. u.s. officials tell "the wall street journal" that american agents have suspended spying on merkel and other world loaders, but they say the agency is still monitoring other leaders because some of the programs are producing useful intelligence. >>> smoke in tiananmen square after a car burst into flames. chinese authorities are staying tight-lipped about the deadly incident. here's more. >> reporter: a car on fire, smoke in the air. these photos show the aftermath of the monday afternoon incident in tiananmen square. i'm now passing the beijing tiananmen square. the authorities are working in this area. there is no one except for armed police in the square. the crash occurred on the north side of the square close to the entrance to the forbidden city. the spot is home to a giant portrait of mao tse tung. the news agency said a sports utility vehicle traveled a few hundred meters, then smashed into a low barrier. three people inside the suv died. two tourists have also died.
.s. ambassadors protested the military move. >>> edward snowden wants the u.s. to stop treating him like a traitor. that's a letter he sent to german chancellor angela merkel. the former nsa contractor being recruited by germany as a witness into merkel's cell phone tap. >>> rebuilding after massive wildfires is a daunting task, but scientists are working on plants after wildfires. this is a report on seeds of success. >> reporter: when a wildfires ignites containment is the first priority. record high temperatures coupled with dry weather whipped up more than a dozen wildfires in colorado this summer. but what happens once the fire is extinguished could be the difference between it fueling more wildfires or preventing them. this is a site of the june 2012 pine ridge wildfire. >> it burned about 14,000 acres in the course of a few days. one day in particular. 10,000 acres burned. >> reporter: andrea is a conservation scientist with the chicago bow tannic garden. >> one problem is invasive species, but its run of the things that helped cause or carry this wildfire further than it otherwise. >> repo
accordingand yahoo! to edward snowden. new job.und a general alexander said he will be illegal for the nsa to break in to any new bases but what if they tap into [inaudible] cable? is do we have a rogue agency in our hands are not? this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national knowligence, what does he and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are instructing on foreign readers? or tell't he tell them the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence new about this. the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long traditional of possible denial. time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. presidents complaint i have -- there's nothing in here that i have not already read in "the new york times." where are you going to get the special goodies? are are showing they meaningful. >> the president said we would not listen in. would you listen in on angela merkel? president -- >> they are not listening to her conversations. ata thatrt of
to talk directly to the former u.s. intelligence operative edward snowden about the nsa's spying activities. >> if the message is that mr. snowden wants to provide us with information and tell us something, then we will gladly accept that. because any clarification, information, and fax we can obtain is a good thing -- and facts we can obtain is a good thing. >> the announcement came after a politician returned from russia with a letter from snowden, offering to give sworn testimony on u.s. spying activities directed at german citizens and leaders. he held a surprise three-hour meeting with snowden in russia on thursday night. snowden reportedly offered to give testimony in germany, but his lawyer said a meeting could only take race and russia -- take place in russia for legal reasons. snowden would have a lot to say to the german people. >> also on friday, germany became the first european country to allow a third gender option for newborn babies. under the new law, babies born with characteristics of both sexes will no longer have to be registered as male or female. many inters
into the servers of google and yahoo! according to edward snowden. he has found a new job. nice that the kid has found work. general alexander said it will be illegal for the nsa to break into any databases. what if they tap into underseas cable? and things like that. is that covered by the government oversight? >> the question is do we have a rogue agency in our hands or not? i am not sure. i accept the arguments they are doing all these things but this goes back to our previous discussion of who is minding the store. we have the director of national intelligence, what does he know and when did he know it and when did they tell the president they are eavesdropping on foreign leaders? why didn't he tell them or tell the president about the scope of the nsa activity if the director of intelligence really knew about this? you cannot keep the commander- in-chief in the dark on things like this. you cannot do it. >> there is a long tradition of plausible deniability. and not telling the top guy how you did it. at the same time, tremendous pressure to provide goodies. the morning briefing the a lot
classified documents provided by former nsa contractor edward snowden. spanish government officials summoned the u.s. ambassador for an explanation. spanish law prohibits the collecting of such information without permission. >>> german media are reporting that agents also bugged chancellor angela merkel's phone. u.s. officials have not denied the allegation but say no such surveillance is taking place now. they say they're conducting a review of their intelligence gathering methods. >> i noted the other day a readout from a phone call the president had with chancellor merkel made clear that we do not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> carney said last summer president barack obama ordered a comprehensive review of how the u.s. gathers intelligence. he said the investigation should be completed by the end of the year. defense secretary chuck hagel says the allegations do not reflect a lack of respect. >> we have great respect for our partners, our allies, who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe, to keep each other safe, to keep our
-hugger jeans in a bunch over the latest revelation from moscow craigslist futon buyer edward snowden. jim? >> german chancellor angela merkel complained directly to president obama today over reports of u.s. spying on her conversations. >> german officials saying they have received information that the chancellor's cell phone may be monitored by american intelligence. >> an angry merkel says the allegations have left u.s. and europeans relations "severely shaken." >> stephen: oh, big deal. (laughter) merkel should be flattered. someone looked at the chancellor of germany and said "i'd tap that." (cheers and applause) besides, we aren't even doing it, right, white house spokesman jay carney? >> i can tell you that the president assures the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> stephen: kay? (laughter) we are not and will not that takes care of the present and the future and there's no other time periodic think of. >> the u.s. has been listening to merkel's cell phone since 2002. >> stephen: oh, the past? who cares!
on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions it ask of the nsa about what is happening in the program. >> it's a different view from the chairman of the house homeland security committee. congressman peter king says america should stop apologising for the nas. >> the reality is the nsa saved thousands of lives - not just the united states, but france, germany and throughout europe. the french carried out spying operations ai gaips the united states -- against the united states. as far as germany - that's where the hamburg plot began laing to nchb -- leading to 9/11. >> former secretary of state madeleine albright agrees, saying the u.s. is not the only one that spies on world leaders, but says france listened to her calls. a french ambassador once ask her about something she said on a private call. madeleine albright said: >> a roadside bo
, thanks to his source, former nsa contractor edward snowden, who is now hold up in russia, but the hits keep coming from him. the diplomatic impact kicked up an order of magnitude, though, over reports from the german paper that german chancellor angela merkel's personal phone, her cell phone, had also been bugged by the nsa after a direct, and i'm guessing kind of brusk call between the chancellor and president obama, the white house released a statement saying that the president "assured the chancellor that the united states is not monitoring and will not monitor the communications of chancellor merkel." is not and will not in the future. those are the key phrases here. so, we're not doing it now and we won't going forward, but did we in the past? >> has the united states monitored the chancellor's phone calls in the past? >> nedra, we are not going to publicly comment on every piece of policy and we have made clear that the united states gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations. >> so, no comment on the past. we don't still do it, we won't do it again, but why
.s. surveillance abroad. the material handed over to a reporter by nsa leaker edward snowden and it's providing a seemingly endless stream of revelations. those revelations are rocking america's relationships with some of its closest allies. christiane amanpour is joining us right now. you just spoke to the reporter who has been breaking all of these edward snowden leaks. what did he just tell you? >> reporter: well, first of all, they have thousands and thousands of documents but also, that he just simply rejects what, for instance, mike rogers, chairman of the house intelligence committee, british prime minister david cameron, many, many u.s. and other allied officials are saying, which is that this is dangerous, what they're doing, that they are putting all sorts of people at risk, they are compromising all sorts of abilities to close down terrorist cells and plots and this and that. he rejects that and always has. this is what he said to me on that. >> every terrorist who is capable of tying their own shoes has long known that the u.s. government and the uk government are trying to monitor
n.s.a. leaker edward snowden is that the u.s. government apparently monitored the phone calls of at least 30 world leaders, including most infamously, german chancellor angela merkel, who was holding up a new encrypted cell phone to say you can't touch me now. a little m.c. hammer there. brit, we've heard about mass data collection. but when you're talking about targeted, the phones of our allies, our friends, people that president obama sits in the oval office with and at summits with, is that over the line? >> do we know if the phones were being actually listened in on and calls recorded and the substance of the calls noted? or is this another case where we have her phone calls, we know whom she called and when and for how long they spoke? my own guess is that it is that which i'veñr just described. and moreover, this has been going on for a long time in one way or another. we spy on foreign leaders, theyñr spy on our leaders or try to. we're better at it perhaps than they are and they don't like it. now it is out in the open. the people affected have to be indignant, and
: the newest edward snowden documents report more spying on america's closest allies. in spain the nsa reports listening in on 60 million phone calls in a single month and in germany a newspaper reports that president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on german chance large angela merkel's calls back in 2010 and contradicting white house assurances that the president was not aware of the extent of the surveillance. the nsa quickly denied the report saying the following. nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving merkel. the nsa's denial a clear step beyond the white house's willingness, up to now, only to deny present and future monitoring. >> i i can tell you that the president assured chancellor that the united states has not monitored and will not monitor the communications of the chancellor. >> reporter: german intelligence experts are supposed to come to the united states to challenge their counterparts on the spying after a german official accused the u.s. of breaking german law on german soil but mike rogers defended the nsa surveillance on cnn sund
with the former vice president dick cheney. cheney says edward snowden is "a traitor." plain and simple. my asthma's under control. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. ♪ ♪ more adventures await in the new seven-passenger lexus gx. lease the 2014 gx 460 for $499 a month for 27 months. see your lexus dealer. for $499 a month for 27 months. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. on
about the fallout from the edward snowden leaks. >> this is the most serious leak, most serious compromise in the u.s. intelligence committee. >> because of the amount of it and the type. >> the amount and the type. >> website reboot. secretary of hhs kathleen sebelius faces questions on capitol hill wednesday after healthcare.gov went down over the weekend adding fuel to the criticism and more fodder for snl. >> i have a number of friendly tips to help you deal with those problems. for example, have you tried restarting your computer. sometimes it helps to turn the computer off and turn it back on. we don't know why. it just does. >> poetic license, the literally legend maya angelou joins us this hour. children's love for books. >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. edward snowden's leaks keep coming faster than the white house can even respond. over the weekend the nsa claimed president obama had no idea angela merkel's personal cell phone was tapped back since 2002. so how credible is that denial? joining me now is chuck todd nbc's white house correspondent, politic
, that includes many that showed over the weekend protesting the nsa and some supporting edward snowden here. this has broadened out and one of the big questions remains today, what information was provided to the president, particularly adds it relates to spying on our allies in the collection of data in that form. >> we don't know what kind of information the administration has. we heard them say they didn't have that information. dianne feinstein wasn't aware of the program. that is an interesting question. either way, it presents problems for the administration if they did know about it, why was that continued to allowed to go forward. if it didn't know about it, why is it oversight of these programs. >> let me play what adam schiff said. >> absolutely believe that the program in its current form for end and be restructured because we can get all of the same information to protect the country that we need to without getting this wealth of data. and all programs should be constitutional, effective and should be structured in a way to minimize any unnecessary intrusion on our privacy. >> w
made by former nsa contractor edward snowden. he describes himself as a whistleblower, but others say he's a traitor. >> christiane amanpour has spoken with the journalist who worked closely with edward snowden to expose these secrets and joins you now from london. you had that interview with glenn greenwald. what struck you most about him, he is one determined man on a bit of a mission really. >> he continues to insist that despite the vociferous criticism that officials have leveled at the snowden leaks and at him and the press for publishing them, it is not all about terrorism. he keeps saying loorks, they want us to believe that everything that's being leaked is just about life and death terrorism. but it's not. there are a lot of other revelations, a lot of revelations about economic and commercial and industrial espionage. there are a lot of revelations obviously which started the firestorm of protests around the world. about spying and collecting metadata from ordinary citizens. that is what really drives glen green wald really, really crazy and let me play you just a little bi
controversy continues to spread. in the wakeover it, edward snowden has had a meeting with a german legislator the, present that person with a letter, speaking the truth is not a crime, i am confident that with the support of the international community the government of united states will abandon this harmful practice. he's seeking some kind of clemency. are there any conditions under which president obama would consider clemency? >> none that have been discussed. >> none at all? >> none. >> it's not on the table? >> it's not been on the table. mr. snowden violated u.s. law. our belief has always been that he should return to the united states and face justice. >> finally, rand paul is our next guest, senator rand paul, do you agree with jay carney your white house colleague, that it would be awesome if rand paul ran for president in 2016? >> i suspect that the the 2016 republican nomination is going to be awesome no matter who runs. >> okay, dan pfeiffer, thanks very much. >>> let's go to senator rand paul right there. you heard dan pfeiffer say it's going to be an awesome race. are you goin
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